Web


Kia ora. We explore what Christchurch City Libraries’ webpages and blog posts and social media postings were popular each month – so we can learn more about what our customers are interested in.

Website pages

Māori content was strong this month, with Te Reo Kete and the kids Māori page both in the top 30.

July’s popular blog posts

Photos on Flickr

There were 101269 views in July. We are at 3,102,092 pageviews.

Top on Twitter

We have 3101 followers. The most popular tweets:

 

Facebook favourites

We have 3858 likes.

Matariki craft at Te Kete Wānanga o Ōraka

Matariki craft at Te Kete Wānanga o Ōraka. Shirley Library. Monday 16 June 2014. Flickr: 2014-06-16-DSC04513

Kia ora. We explore what Christchurch City Libraries’ webpages and blog posts and social media postings were popular each month – so we can learn more about what our customers are interested in.

Website pages

Our kids Matariki page was the 4th most popular web page this month. It had 6,831 page views. The rest of our Matariki pages featured strongly too.

June’s popular blog posts

Photos on Flickr

There were 111,455 views in June. We are at 3,000,823 pageviews.

The busiest day was 18 June, and this photo of Matariki craft in action was popular.

Top on Twitter

We have 3063 followers. The most popular tweets:

Facebook favourites

 

We have 3830 likes.

Most popular posts:

Some useful and interesting stuff on the WWW, with a library focus:

Weve

The most excellent Kiwi librarians Sally Pewhairangi and Megan Ingle – Heroesmingle – have launched a library-focused magazine Weve. I am looking forward to exploring what they have to day:

Te Papa images

Libraries

But wait, there’s more:

SarahKia ora. We explore what Christchurch City Libraries’ webpages and blog posts and social media postings were popular each month – so we can learn more about what our customers are interested in.

Website pages

A flange of baboons, a destruction of cats, a waddling of ducks … The kids’ page on collective nouns for groups of animals was number one in May.

May’s popular blog posts

Photos on Flickr

There were 129,795 views in May. We are at 2,889,368 page views.

Top on Twitter

Pyjama party - NZ Post Book Awards for Children and Young adults

We have 3020 followers.

Facebook favourites

We have 3814 likes.

Martian Party Holiday programme

Martian Party Holiday programme, Spreydon Library, CCL-150-732

Today we are 7 – Christchurch City Libraries celebrates seven years of being social online.

We launched our blog on 22 May 2007.

Why are we social? Librarians and libraries are naturally sociable critters. We love information to be free, and freely available. Social media gives us an online platform to share our stuff, ask and answer questions, inform people about events and resources, and have conversations with customers.

Here is a look back on our social history.

Our social media timeline

2007

22 May: Christchurch City Libraries blog is launched, with the first posts from the 2007 Auckland Writers and Readers Festival. Here is our first post.

7 June: Bibliofile blog is launched, with the first posts coming from a conference in the United Kingdom on joint school/public libraries.

2008

August: Christchurch City Libraries joins Flickr.

2010

12 April: Christchurch kids blog is launched. Read the first post.

15 September: Christchurch City Libraries joins Twitter as @ChristchurchLib.

2011

January: BiblioCommons catalogue is launched. Users can rate items, make lists, and share opinions by using this social catalogue.

March: Christchurch City Libraries establishes a Facebook presence.

2013

1 September
Ahead of WW100 commemorations, we established a Twitter account 100chch. Read the first tweet.

2 September
Our Flickr site passes one and a half million (1,500,000) page views.

Where we’re at today

A little light statistics, as at 21 May 2014:

  • Flickr 2,839,975 views
  • Facebook 3806 likes
  • Twitter 2983 followers

Analysis

Articles on how we use social media, and analysis of our statistics.

Opening of Lyttelton Road Tunnel  Libraries Manager, Carolyn Robertson Flooded Avon River on Oxford Terrace Camilla Läckberg

Most shared

Join in

We’d love you all to join in the conversation online – here’s where it is happening:

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra

Christchurch Symphony Orchestra. Central Library Peterborough. Saturday 10 May 2014. Flickr: 2014-05-10-IMG_0182

 

Kia ora. We explore what Christchurch City Libraries’ webpages and blog posts and social media postings were popular each month – so we can learn more about what our customers are interested in.

Website pages

The kids ANZAC Day page was in the top 5 this month.

April’s popular blog posts

Photos on FlickrKākāpō at Central Library Manchester

There were 84,061 views in April. We are at 2,759,573 page views.

Top on Twitter

We have 2954 followers. The most popular tweets:

Facebook favourites

We have 3797 likes.

Most popular posts:

Kia ora. We explore what Christchurch City Libraries’ webpages and blog posts and social media postings were popular each month – so we can learn more about what our customers are interested in.

Website pages

The Source, and Kids pages were the most viewed this month, and also in the top 20 were the Book Sale and the Treaty of Waitangi.

March’s popular blog posts

Photos on Flickr

There were 274,197 views in March. We are at 2,675,512 page views.

4 and 5 March were very busy days – we clocked up 106,297 views on those two days (due to photos of the flooded Avon River in town).

Our most popular photo is this view of the flood by Our City O-Tautahi.
Flooded Avon River on Oxford Terrace

Top on Twitter

We have 2910 followers. The most popular tweets:

Facebook favourites

We have 3684 likes.

The Avon River in town photo album was our busiest Facebook post ever with 106 shares, 49,800 engagement and 7,500 reach.

Over at Library Journal, the latest batch of Movers and Shakers – 50 passionate library people – is out.

Here in Aotearoa, librarians are sharing their ideas and practices in Library Life.The first issue of Library Life for 2014 is out – in PDF format.

Library Life editor Abigail Willemse has put together an interesting selection this month. The focus is social media and how to blend (or separate) the personal and professional.

Cath Sheard (on Twitter as @kiwilibrarian) in Being social can be professional too (p.11-12):

If what you’re saying is meant to matter, let people identify you.

Judi Kercher of Massey University in Social media reflects real life … (p. 13) argues:

To me, social media reflects different aspects of me – my work life and my personal life and, as I keep them separate in real life, I also keep them separate online.

There is plenty more interesting professional stuff to explore, with reports on IFLA and volunteering in Timor-Leste.

Its always difficult trying to parse a conference as diverse as Webstock into a few lines of blog posts or a 1 hour talk. Sometimes I end up talking about a handful of the fascinating sessions, the ones that really resonated with me or the ones that seemed to have the most bearing on libraries, our work and our customers. Often I try to draw out a theme or two, as Webstock speakers often seem to have shared themes. It never does justice to either the speakers or the event as a whole. This year you’re getting a book/link list c/o BiblioCommons and a Wordle. Enjoy, explore, employ.

The Webstock 2014 book / link list

Cover of The year without pants by Scott BerkunThis list features books by Webstock 2014 speakers as well as those they refer to, their presentations where they’ve been posted publicly, websites that they have referred to or in some cases their own websites.

The books in particular are very interesting in that you’ll notice that NONE of them are to do with web specifically. In fact most of them are to do with psychology, or rather thinking, with some design and media stuff thrown in. That’s because, despite its name, Webstock is not really a web conference (any more?) – sure most of its speakers and attendees are doing stuff on the web, but then most of everyone is on the web these days. If you tied me down and tickled me for an answer I would say that Webstock is about creativity. Not (only) arty farty creativity but the creativity that makes us make and innovate, whether it’s a really great public service website, a music album, an orchestra, a park, a health programme; and creating the conditions that maximise that creativity.

My Webstock ’14 Wordle

Wordle based on phrases from webstock 2014

Check out that great big change. Not that that’s surprising – whether it was Liz’s “QUIT”, or Tom’s “revolution not evolution”, or Scott’s “‘what we’ve always done’ has no value”, there was a huge emphasis (see, a theme emerges) of making major changes to the way you do things and think about things, of letting go of the past and its baggage and reassessing where your plans are taking you. So to end this rambling summary I’m going to leave you with some of the snippets that made up the above and encourage you to have a look at the book/link list – I’ll be adding to it from time to time, particularly as the conference videos emerge.

Choose important over urgent… Erase the meanings that are holding you back.

Do it properly. Stop making digital services as if you’re buying something.

Don’t underestimate passion and human spirit. Take a leap of faith.

Don’t write a strategy, deliver. Go back to first principles, focus on user need.

Create patterns for personal serendipity. Create rituals.

Choose a gap, start small and run fast. Optimise for momentum.

Some useful and interesting stuff on the WWW:

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