The Future Sound of Libraries- Matt Finch: OPEN17 LIANZA Conference

Ah. Matt Finch’s keynote. He gave us Chris. Or should I say “Chrises”.

Then this.

We danced to this … and danced a library.

… For Alex and for the power of remembrance.

We visited a mobile library, and I borrowed one of my favourite books: When the wind blows by Raymond Briggs. (read this, and watch the Brit tv series Threads – the two perfect artefacts of  80s nuclear fear)

We met Bowie and Jobriath and Ann Magnuson.
Your collection is a springboard to creativity.

We designed a new exciting event and programming for our libraries.

We sung Oma rapeti.

And we met librarians from Australia and New Zealand doing awesome stuff.  Lesley Ahwang Acres, Field Officer with Indigenous Library Services at the State Library of Queensland (here she is at her session).

Amy Walduck and Sally Turbitt.

Rachael and Hamish talked about the important and life-changing work Auckland Libraries is doing with the streeties community. (read A home for the homeless: Rachael Rivera and the Auckland Library Streeties).

And we finished with a lineup of these awesome GLAMR peoples.
Kia ora. Bravo. Inspirational. Thanks.

More Matt

More LIANZA

The Dangerous Myth about librarians – Laurinda Thomas: OPEN17 LIANZA Conference

OPEN 2017 – the 2017 LIANZA Conference – officially kicked off on Sunday afternoon with a mihi whakatau and kai. Niamh Shaw the MC brought us together after that, and launched an afternoon of dangerous myths, future sounds, and an awards ceremony.

Kelsey Johnstone of Christchurch City Libraries, LIANZA councillor for the Aoraki region, introduced Laurinda Thomas.

Kelsey Johnston
Laurinda Thomas

Laurinda’s well known in library land for her TedX talk The Dangerous Myth about Libraries.

In this keynote, she looked into the dangerous myth about librarians.  This time it’s personal – it’s the things we tell ourselves:

Will we flourish or will we let the weight of that history hold us back from what we could be?

The most important resource in libraries? It’s librarians. And it is librarians that will determine what the future of the profession looks like.

This keynote was packed with ideas and conversations, and emphasised the importance of intentionality  – of knowing what we do, why we do it, and for whom. I’ve picked out some of her key points, and the slides that illustrated her ideas.

Laurinda focused on the here and now, not the future – the real work and real positive outcomes for the people we serve. We were social entrepreneurs before the phrase existed.

Libraries are powerful. They provide internet access and modern life relies on it completely.  Citizens can’t have human rights without access. We are providing people with a human right that opens up employment, communication with family, and democracy. The systematic cuts that UK libraries are enduring in the wake of austerity measures are not a politically neutral act. Cutting library budgets is reducing the education of citizens, and impacting on their rights.

We have power as librarians, and that can make us feel conflicted.  There is a hierachy amongst the people we serve, and the people we report to. These groups aren’t the same, one includes society’s most vulnerable, and the other includes some of the most privileged.

When we use the word “relevant”, we imply the opposite.

When we talk about “saving our libraries”, we signal powerlessness, and the need to be saved.

When Laurinda did her TEDx talk, a woman spoke to her and said the talk made her angry. It was a retired librarian, and she’d been part of the same conversations 30 years ago.

How do we have better conversations? Talk to the people who haven’t been into a library for ten years. Not everyone can afford books, or has a quiet place to go. Not everyone has internet access, or even a home.

Some people don’t give a damn about the social good of the library.

So find out what matters to them, and back up your stories with facts.

Dare to ask about the things we find confronting:

Are you represented?

If the library wasn’t here, what would you do?

Do you know someone who would never come to the library?

The elephants in the room:

  • Misusing numbers – conflating statistics with opinions about value, but really we are more interested in outcomes than numbers.
  • Relying on our “obvious” value (it’s not obvious)
  • Being lazy about biculturalism. (we haven’t moved enough in this area, not by a long stretch)
  • Looking for a single thing to save us (and I bet that thing will also make us “relevant”)
  • Avoiding politics.

Libraries are not ideologically neutral. We  support access to information, lifetime learning, and the social good. Political awareness is part of the job.

Get up there. Do public speaking. Speak from the heart. To be visible is to be courageous.

Make our profession impossible to ignore.

A selector’s view of the LIANZA Conference

I am excited about going to the LIANZA conference on Tuesday. I will be focusing on three strands that are important to me as a selector for Christchurch City Libraries. Broadly speaking they are:

  • Customer experience
  • eBook usage and licensing agreements
  • Being open to indigenous knowledge.
Kim Tairi keynote
Kim Tairi keynote. LIANZA Conference 2015. Flickr LIANZA-2015-IMG_0843

The way we present the library content we select with great care is all important. I would like to explore new ideas of presentation and customer interaction at the conference.

I will be wearing my e-hat when going to the session on eBook usage and licensing agreements. Will this help me in the future to better explain to self-publishing authors why I can’t buy their eBook from them direct?

As the selector for New Zealand nonfiction I also make the decision which books will be shelved in our Ngā Pounamu collections. I hope to get a lot out of the paper that gives an overview of how other non-Māori librarians are making sense of Māori knowledge.

  • Visit the LIANZA Conference page for more information.
  • Follow the #open17 hashtag on Twitter for conference-related tweets.

Cornelia Oehler
Selection & Access Librarian

Digital Library Tiki Tour

The Digital Library is a branch of our network, it’s open 24 hours and 7 days. You can visit it from a physical library, or from home, or anywhere you are. This Tiki Tour takes a trip around our online offerings.

City of Christchurch, central area, 1978, CCLMaps 221674
City of Christchurch, central area, 1978, CCLMaps 221674

Finding your way around

Our homepage is structured like this:

Top navigation includes a search box, Hours and Location info, your login, and content sorted into About, Explore, eResources, What’s on and Learning.

Explore pages let you browse new stuff and relevant blog posts and info — see the popular Kids Explore menu for an example.

The main homepage is made up of content cards sorted into channels. These are moveable, so the homepage doesn’t always look the same. The library’s main event has the prime “hero” spot. There is a feed of the latest blog posts, and the events calendar.

Channels pull together content cards on a topic. See our Recommended channel.

The footer links to important info and contact details.

Dip into eResources

Your library card and password/PIN give you access to eResources. Try:

PressReader is a large digital newspaper and magazine library. Full-page replicas of current print editions, including editorial content, graphics and advertising.

OverDrive is a free eBook and eAudiobook collection.

RBDigital magazines has hundreds of digital magazines including many popular New Zealand titles on wide range of subjects.

Here’s a peek at my shelf of RBDigital eMags.

Make connections in your community

Explore local content

We have a strong focus on Christchurch heritage. Have a look at the following resources:

Discover more digitised resources.

Pin Group, 25 Cents, VolksWagens, CCL-Ephemera-Music-Rock-1980s-Poster0002
Pin Group, 25 Cents, VolksWagens, CCL-Ephemera-Music-Rock-1980s-Poster0002

Find out about services

Keep up–to–date

uncover - huraina
uncover – huraina

Play in the catalogue

Search our catalogue to find books, images, music, magazines, DVDs and more. Use a catalogue app on your mobile.

You can make booklists, rate books, write reviews, and share your opinions on our social catalogue.

Library blog posts can connect into the catalogue, and we can also link events so if you are searching for a book by Clementine Ford, you’ll see that she’s here in Christchurch in September.

Recommended

Staff Pickles is a team of librarians that aim to bring you recommendations with flavour. The Pickles share booklists, book reviews, and blog posts – all about the books, movies, TV, and music they love, and you can ask them for reading recommendations.

Here’s me and my latest recommendations and faves:

Connect with social media

Need more help?

For more help, contact our helpful librarians.

Top of the web – February 2017

Kia ora. The latest information on what webpages and blog posts were popular in February.
15 February was a busy day online as we shared information about the Port Hills Fire – 38,759 impressions on Twitter and 40 tweets.

Story time
Library staff at Parklands at Play event, Parklands Reserve, Sunday 19 February 2017. Flickr 2017-2-19-20170219_163456

Website pages

There were 283,051 page views in February. The most popular pages on christchurchcitylibraries.com:

  1. Kids Treaty Zone (NEW)
  2. The Treaty of Waitangi / Te Tiriti o Waitangi (NEW)
  3. Learning Centres (NEW)
  4. About PressReader (formerly PressDisplay) (1st last month)
  5. Books browse page (4th last month)
  6. Hornby Library (3rd last month)
  7. My account (2nd last month)
  8. Waitangi Day (NEW)
  9. Kids browse page (6th last month)
  10. 22 February 2011 Canterbury earthquake for kids (NEW)

February’s popular blog posts

Popular blog posts published in February on the website:

Photos on Flickr

There were 97,454 page views in February on Flickr. It now has a total of 6,189,368 views.

Top on Twitter

We have 4503 followers. Follow us on Twitter.

#chch Civil Defence Emergency Operations Centre reactivated as Port Hills fire shifts closer to properties. ^DR

The view from Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre is, er, hmmm.
All our libraries remain open and have power, FYI. ^MT

State of Emergency declared in Christchurch and Selwyn.  #porthillsfire ^DR

Facebook favourites

We have 6423 likes. Like us on Facebook.

Wow! Our buddies at Waimakariri Libraries have created a buzz on Facebook – with cat hair craft. Onya! ^Donna

Get rid of your abandoned craft and sewing projects and discover new inspiration (at no cost) at The Great Stash Swap this Sunday ^Moata

I got to have a sneaky peek at this new book before it came out. A really interesting and different look at what all those roadworks and holes in the ground around the city are about. Fascinating for kids of all ages and all for the great cause that is Ronald McDonald House South Island ^Moata https://my.christchurchcitylibraries.com/blogs/post/christchurch-our-underground-story/



If you are interested in how we derive our rankings, we measure page views on our website, organic reach for Facebook posts, and impressions for tweets.