Three wicked problems and one set of strategic directions

One of the benefits of attending a LIANZA Conference is the opportunity, as the cliché says, to broaden your horizons. True to its name, OPEN 2017 did this in spades for me, with a variety of practical workshops and big idea keynotes.

A session that particularly reminded me of the wider importance of our profession was the talk by National Librarian Bill Macnaught. Bill highlighted the National Library’s Strategic Directions to 2030, a document that first saw the light at the end of 2016, but which I had shamefully not been aware of (bad librarian!).

Turning knowledge into value - Strategic directions to 2030
Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa – National Library of New Zealand, Attribution 3.0 New Zealand (CC BY 3.0 NZ)

Yet the three themes (aka in Bill’s words the “wicked problems”) of the Strategic Directions  — Taonga, Knowledge, and Reading — are crucial to the future not just of the National Library but of our country as a whole. You can read more about them on the National Library’s website, but here is my summary for those who like me tend to fall into the tl;dr category.

Issues

Taonga

  • Are we collecting the right things that we want to share for posterity? Are we doing so collectively across the country?
  • Are we looking after these taonga in a fit manner? How do we mitigate the risks to these treasures? (A very pertinent question, given that the very night before Bill spoke there had been a fire at the National Library: the very building that houses our important documents of Nationhood)
  • How do we ensure that the resources that are being preserved digitally will be easily accessible to New Zealanders in a hundred years’ time?

Knowledge

  • How do we make it much easier to share knowledge across New Zealand? How do we overcome the legacy of thinking of our own institutions first?

Reading

  • How do we create a nation of readers? According to the Tertiary Education Commission, almost half the adult population struggles with the written word. Functional literacy is not as good as it needs to be to ensure a prosperous and healthy Aotearoa.
Book "whare" in children's area
Book “whare” in children’s area, Christchurch City Libraries. Flickr 2016-01-20-IMG-1205

Focus areas

The Strategic Directions highlight the following areas as key goals:

  • New Zealand’s collections of documentary heritage and taonga will be well-managed and consistently cared for, regardless of format, and readily available.
  • All collecting organisations will have access to expertise to use new technologies and tools, so that digital preservation will be integrated into their collecting policies.
  • New Zealand institutions will act as one knowledge network, with seamless access points.
  • New Zealanders will be engaged with these resources and inspired to create new knowledge, especially resources in te reo Māori.
  • Collections will reflect the diversity of people in New Zealand and the Pacific, and the importance of Māori as tangata whenua.
  • A national campaign of reading for pleasure will improve New Zealanders’ functional literacy levels.
  • New Zealanders will have the digital literacy skills to access and use knowledge.
  • Te reo Māori will be revitalised and used throughout Aotearoa.

Key success factors

Bill identified these key success factors:

  • Collective impact approach and mutually reinforcing activities (e.g. through enabling and demonstration projects that we can all focus on).
  • Acknowledgement that we have common agenda.
  • Shared measurement – we need to be clear about what success look like for all parties.
  • Backbone support from the National Library.
  • And that usual supect: continuous communication.

Do you agree with the themes, issues and focus areas of the National Library’s Strategic Directions to 2030? Or perhaps you have a brilliant idea to help us achieve these?

If so, please spread the word (remember the importance of continuous communication…) and/or email NatlibFuture@dia.govt.nz

P.S. Want to read more about OPEN 2017? Check out Kat’s A LIANZA #open17 Bibliography.

Read your way into the local profession – subscribe to the Aoraki LIANZA blog

It’s well worth Ōtautahi librarians subscribing to the Aoraki LIANZA blog.  Check out some recent posts:

LIANZA event An evening with Ilona Kish

Ilona took the stage to speak of her current projects as the Director of Public Libraries 2020. She spoke of her key areas of focus:

Building positive perceptions and increasing the visibility libraries for policy makers. Sadly many policy makers haven’t set foot in a library for 10-20 years.

Help librarians connect internationally – to build on the sensibility that it’s really important to talk to people outside of your back yard, leverage your resources, find and connect with others. Keep a sense of what’s going on in your bigger picture.

Some of the challenges Ilona’s considering are:

What will happen to Public Libraries 2020 after Gates Foundation funding ends, they’re spending $150 million over 5 years there is only one of those 5 years remaining.

Hope to capture all the learnings of the last 4 years and make sure they’re picked up by the next generation.

Ilona Kish

Read more of Remy’s post

More interesting recent posts:

 

The Future Sound of Libraries- Matt Finch: OPEN17 LIANZA Conference

Ah. Matt Finch’s keynote. He gave us Chris. Or should I say “Chrises”.

Then this.

We danced to this … and danced a library.

… For Alex and for the power of remembrance.

We visited a mobile library, and I borrowed one of my favourite books: When the wind blows by Raymond Briggs. (read this, and watch the Brit tv series Threads – the two perfect artefacts of  80s nuclear fear)

We met Bowie and Jobriath and Ann Magnuson.
Your collection is a springboard to creativity.

We designed a new exciting event and programming for our libraries.

We sung Oma rapeti.

And we met librarians from Australia and New Zealand doing awesome stuff.  Lesley Ahwang Acres, Field Officer with Indigenous Library Services at the State Library of Queensland (here she is at her session).

Amy Walduck and Sally Turbitt.

Rachael and Hamish talked about the important and life-changing work Auckland Libraries is doing with the streeties community. (read A home for the homeless: Rachael Rivera and the Auckland Library Streeties).

And we finished with a lineup of these awesome GLAMR peoples.
Kia ora. Bravo. Inspirational. Thanks.

More Matt

More LIANZA

Digital Library Tiki Tour

The Digital Library is a branch of our network, it’s open 24 hours and 7 days. You can visit it from a physical library, or from home, or anywhere you are. This Tiki Tour takes a trip around our online offerings.

City of Christchurch, central area, 1978, CCLMaps 221674
City of Christchurch, central area, 1978, CCLMaps 221674

Finding your way around

Our homepage is structured like this:

Top navigation includes a search box, Hours and Location info, your login, and content sorted into About, Explore, eResources, What’s on and Learning.

Explore pages let you browse new stuff and relevant blog posts and info — see the popular Kids Explore menu for an example.

The main homepage is made up of content cards sorted into channels. These are moveable, so the homepage doesn’t always look the same. The library’s main event has the prime “hero” spot. There is a feed of the latest blog posts, and the events calendar.

Channels pull together content cards on a topic. See our Recommended channel.

The footer links to important info and contact details.

Dip into eResources

Your library card and password/PIN give you access to eResources. Try:

PressReader is a large digital newspaper and magazine library. Full-page replicas of current print editions, including editorial content, graphics and advertising.

OverDrive is a free eBook and eAudiobook collection.

RBDigital magazines has hundreds of digital magazines including many popular New Zealand titles on wide range of subjects.

Here’s a peek at my shelf of RBDigital eMags.

Make connections in your community

Explore local content

We have a strong focus on Christchurch heritage. Have a look at the following resources:

Discover more digitised resources.

Pin Group, 25 Cents, VolksWagens, CCL-Ephemera-Music-Rock-1980s-Poster0002
Pin Group, 25 Cents, VolksWagens, CCL-Ephemera-Music-Rock-1980s-Poster0002

Find out about services

Keep up–to–date

uncover - huraina
uncover – huraina

Play in the catalogue

Search our catalogue to find books, images, music, magazines, DVDs and more. Use a catalogue app on your mobile.

You can make booklists, rate books, write reviews, and share your opinions on our social catalogue.

Library blog posts can connect into the catalogue, and we can also link events so if you are searching for a book by Clementine Ford, you’ll see that she’s here in Christchurch in September.

Recommended

Staff Pickles is a team of librarians that aim to bring you recommendations with flavour. The Pickles share booklists, book reviews, and blog posts – all about the books, movies, TV, and music they love, and you can ask them for reading recommendations.

Here’s me and my latest recommendations and faves:

Connect with social media

Need more help?

For more help, contact our helpful librarians.

Some light library inspo to start the New Year…

Because really who wants to tackle some heavy reading or weighty issues first up in 2016?

I was fortunate enough to attend Shout! Karanga Rā, the annual LIANZA conference in Wellington in November.  Unlike the physical exhaustion I experienced in completing the my first half marathon in Queenstown that same month, post-conference it was my brain that was overwhelmed after four days of ideas, conversations, laughter, themes and information.

Speakers from New Zealand and around the world inspired, challenged and made us laugh. In the interests of keeping things light to kick off the year, here are some memorable quotes and comments that captured my attention:

“The library listens, interprets and makes awesome things happen” + The public library should be fun!” – the effervescent Justin Hoenke Director of Benson Memorial Library in Pennsylvania.

“Australia is full of bogans” – Ghil’ad Zuckermann, chair of Linguistics and Endangered Languages at the University of Adelaide, currently working on the revival of the Barngarla Aboriginal language. Fascinating style of delivery for his keynote opening with a Hebrew song sung to the tune of Pokarekare Ana and great application of the ‘Driver Reviver’ message to saving languages.

“Everyone f**king hates councils, but everyone loves libraries” – Nigel Latta wondering why his council doesn’t promote their libraries as their awesome service to improve credibility with their ratepayers + “work life balance is bollocks” + “practice a growth mindset” – changing your worldview from fixed to one open to change.

“The World Wide Web is the reading room of the 21st century” – Bill MacNaught, National Librarian.

“The library is the Agora of the community” + “libraries need to be more like Bowie” – Kim Tairi, University Librarian, Swinburne University.

Kim Tairi keynote
Kim Tairi keynote. LIANZA Conference. Wednesday 11 November 2015. Flickr LIANZA-2015-IMG_0853

“Do what people need but market what they want” – Ned Potter from the University of York and his Library Marketing Manifesto.

Ned Potter
Ned Potter. LIANZA Conference. Tuesday 10 November 2015. Flickr LIANZA-2015-IMG_0702