Top of the web – February 2017

Kia ora. The latest information on what webpages and blog posts were popular in February.
15 February was a busy day online as we shared information about the Port Hills Fire – 38,759 impressions on Twitter and 40 tweets.

Story time
Library staff at Parklands at Play event, Parklands Reserve, Sunday 19 February 2017. Flickr 2017-2-19-20170219_163456

Website pages

There were 283,051 page views in February. The most popular pages on christchurchcitylibraries.com:

  1. Kids Treaty Zone (NEW)
  2. The Treaty of Waitangi / Te Tiriti o Waitangi (NEW)
  3. Learning Centres (NEW)
  4. About PressReader (formerly PressDisplay) (1st last month)
  5. Books browse page (4th last month)
  6. Hornby Library (3rd last month)
  7. My account (2nd last month)
  8. Waitangi Day (NEW)
  9. Kids browse page (6th last month)
  10. 22 February 2011 Canterbury earthquake for kids (NEW)

February’s popular blog posts

Popular blog posts published in February on the website:

Photos on Flickr

There were 97,454 page views in February on Flickr. It now has a total of 6,189,368 views.

Top on Twitter

We have 4503 followers. Follow us on Twitter.

#chch Civil Defence Emergency Operations Centre reactivated as Port Hills fire shifts closer to properties. ^DR

The view from Te Hāpua: Halswell Centre is, er, hmmm.
All our libraries remain open and have power, FYI. ^MT

State of Emergency declared in Christchurch and Selwyn.  #porthillsfire ^DR

Facebook favourites

We have 6423 likes. Like us on Facebook.

Wow! Our buddies at Waimakariri Libraries have created a buzz on Facebook – with cat hair craft. Onya! ^Donna

Get rid of your abandoned craft and sewing projects and discover new inspiration (at no cost) at The Great Stash Swap this Sunday ^Moata

I got to have a sneaky peek at this new book before it came out. A really interesting and different look at what all those roadworks and holes in the ground around the city are about. Fascinating for kids of all ages and all for the great cause that is Ronald McDonald House South Island ^Moata https://my.christchurchcitylibraries.com/blogs/post/christchurch-our-underground-story/



If you are interested in how we derive our rankings, we measure page views on our website, organic reach for Facebook posts, and impressions for tweets.

Tweetapalooza at the LIANZA Conference 2015

The LIANZA Conference 2015 was brilliant – loud, proud, full of ideas. And the rowdiness wasn’t just in the building – it was online. I’ve never been to an event where so many people were tweeting, taking pics, and typing on devices. I got to meet plenty of the wonderful library people I connect with on Twitter.

It was a veritable Tweetapalooza – the hashtag #shout15 was even trending on NZ Twitter at various times.

I’ve pulled together a bunch of conference tweets using Storify. It is a good way to get the flavour of Shout! Karanga Rā:

Stuart Palmer  @s_palm did some great analysis of how many #shout15 tweets were published, how they connected, etc.  9561 tweets recorded as at 12 November.

The hashtag #shout15 still has legs, as keynote speaker Ned Potter has shared this frank and wonderful post on what it means to come all the way to Aotearoa for a conference.

I’ve been thinking of another thing to consider about tweeting from a conference – should you tweet as your institution, or as yourself? I made the call to do it as the library. There are pros and cons to that – tweeting as Christchurch City Libraries meant we showed we were in amongst it. But it also meant people who follow @ChristchurchLib got a lot more insider library stuff than usual. It’s open to debate.

Why is Twitter so useful at a library conference?:

  1. A tweet shows ideas that hit the mark, provoked, excited, challenged, surprised. It is like an exclamation marking saying “This!”
  2. You can get a glimpse into the sessions you didn’t go to. Your envy might be mollified (or enhanced) by the way someone tweets about it.
  3. It is a handy aide–mémoire for recalling the ideas that you found most interesting. Makes writing up your notes much easier! You’ve already used the highlighter by tweeting something.
  4. It allows anyone who is not at conference to see what people are shouting about.
  5. You can use the hashtag to hunt out other people’s splendid thoughts. And share them, passionately.

Finally, I’d like to do a shoutout for @leerowe who did something that combined Twitter (digital) and analogue in a deeply appealing way – it is proof that the way you use Twitter at a conference can be idiosyncratic, personal, and filled with character.

Facebook – Pukamata

Kia ora. This post is a brief introduction to Facebook, and a look at ways of making it work for you.

What is Facebook?

Facebook is a social network that started in 2004. Facebook has a large audience, and allows you to connect with friends, relatives, groups, and local organisations. According to Facebook’s research, Kiwis use it primarily to stay connected with friends and family, while nearly 8 in 10 also make product and brand discoveries via Facebook. As at April 2015, over 2.5 million Kiwis active on Facebook every month.

Find out more key trends about Kiwis on Facebook.

Getting started on Facebook

Read the terms of use and privacy policy before you sign up. Create an account. Go to settings and adjust the privacy of your profile if you don’t want everyone to see your information.

Facebook

Using Facebook

Set up your network by searching for friends, relatives, events, and organisations you are interested in and “Liking” them. “Liking” other people’s pages and profiles means you might see their posts in your news feed.

Posting on Facebook

You can post a story by picking what type of story you want to share, and typing in any details you want to add. You can tag your friends or other organisations if you want them to be notified, and you can also tag people in photos you share.

Hashtags make topics and phrases into clickable links in your posts. This brings together posts on particular topics.

Find out how to post and share.

Facebook post

Posting photos and videos

You can share photos and videos on Facebook. A good way to do this is by making an album of images. Facebook automatically resizes and formats your photos when you add them to Facebook. To help make sure your photos appear in the highest possible quality, try these tips – Resize your photo to one of the following supported sizes: Regular photos (width in pixels): 720px, 960px, 2048px. Cover photos should be 851px by 315px.

News feed

Find out how the news feed works. It can sort by either Top Stories – worked out by Facebook metrics based on the number of comments and likes a post receives and what kind of story it is – or Most Recent.

FB news feed

The number of comments and likes a post receives and what kind of story it is (photo, video, status update) can make it more likely to appear in your News Feed. You can adjust your settings if you aren’t seeing the posts you want to.

Facebook groups

Facebook groups enable you to connect with groups like family, coworkers, or those who share a hobby or special interest. A Facebook group is a dedicated space where you can share updates, photos or documents and message other group members. You can also select one of three privacy options so the group can be private if you choose.

Find out more about Facebook groups.

Facebook events

Facebook events are a great way of building a community. If you make an event page, you can invite people to the event, and you can also share information on it.

Find out more about Creating and editing events.

For an example, see this Matariki event on Facebook.

Matariki1

Facebook pages

You can create a Facebook page for your group, organisation, or business. It gives you a space to share events and other information.

Find out how to create a page.

Facebook Insights

Facebook Insights allows you to find out more about users of your Facebook page. What demographic are they in? When are they online? What posts do they find most engaging? Use the data to help you. For example, if your users are mostly online between 6pm and 9pm, you can schedule posts for this time for maximum reach.

Local pages

Here are some Christchurch Facebook pages that illustrate how an active presence and community can work well. They take a different approach and yet are all effective:

Useful Facebook resources

Cover of Facebook Marketing Cover of Intimacy and friendship on Facebook Cover of Facebook

Spread the word: Using social media to promote community programmes and events

Christchurch City Libraries has been using social media since 2007 when we started our blog. Since then, we have added Flickr, Facebook, and Twitter. These tools help us share our stuff, inform people about events and resources, and allow us to have conversations with our customers. Here are some things to consider, particularly if your community group is using social media.

Think, practice, and play

Why does your group want to use social media? The best reason is to be where people are, and to be able to communicate with them. Once you’ve decided that, there are many social media tools you can use.

Play with them as yourself before you launch your organisation’s online presence. This gives you time to see how the platform works, to practice using it, and to become more familiar with getting the best out of the medium. Once you have launched on a social network, spend some time posting and browsing.

Bike Maintenance Evening

Orange Chair @ Parklands. Bike Maintenance Evening with The Bike Shop’s Graeme Taylor at Parklands Library, 18 June 2015. Flickr: Orange-Chair-Bike-Maintenance-1060721.jpg

Plan and prepare

Once you’ve become more familiar with how social media and various platforms work, consider how you will use it. Think sustainability.

  • What tools best suit your organisation?
  • Who will be doing the writing and posting?
  • How much time do they have?
  • Can the tasks be shared?

Favourite tweets and like Facebook posts that you think work well. You can learn a lot from good examples:

  • What wording works?
  • Is there a call to action?
  • What makes you want to read more?

Be there

The most effectively communicated message is tailored to the medium – in Twitter you need to be pithy and punchy, in Facebook you have a bit more room to explain things.

There are tools that allow you to share posts between platforms, but it is best to do a Facebook post in Facebook etc. Being present also allows you to gauge what’s happening in the community, to answer queries, and to take part in discussions.

You should be a listener as well as a broadcaster.

The World of David Walliams
David Walliams. WORD Christchurch Autumn Season. Charles Luney Auditorium, St Margarets College, Christchurch. Flickr 2015-05-14-IMG_7286

Timeliness

Be alert. If something is in the news, share what you have that is useful and relevant. Timeliness is one of the most powerful advantages of social media – it is no coincidence that Twitter is quoted often by the media. If you are promoting an event, give people plenty of prior warning and follow up with more messages closer to the time. It is not a simple matter of mentioning the event once.

Photos, pictures, and video are powerhouses

What’s the stuff that gets people revved up in social media? Images and videos – historical and  contemporary – have great traction. Whether they are heritage images, photos of events, or shots from around town – these are often things that get retweeted, reposted, liked, and shared.

We use Flickr to manage our images, and this works well in a social media context. You can plop images easily into blog posts. It also interacts well with Twitter, Facebook,  and Tumblr. Build up your collection of images by keeping your eyes peeled for interesting things. It is easy to take and share photos in the age of digital cameras and smartphones.

If you are on Facebook, have a go at making an album of images. They make the most of your pictures, and are easily shareable. Think about the size of the image you are using – a PDF A4 portrait poster might look good pinned up on a noticeboard, but on Facebook it’s not ideal.

If you have graphics, images, or posters you want people to share or print out, consider having a downloads section on your blog or website.

Taking photos during your event is not only a record of what happened, it is a great tool for you to use when promoting your next one.

Te Pao o Tahu kapa haka group in performance

Te Pao o Tahu kapa haka group in performance Matariki at the Christchurch Botanic Gardens, Sunday 21 June 2015. Flickr: 2015-06-21-IMG_7703

Participate as well as promote

Start conversations with your followers. If you have questions, ask them. Answer their questions. Comment on their posts. Follow other local groups and organisations, and you will be setting up a useful network for your group.

If you want an idea on which organisations to follow, see who your favourite groups are following – and then follow them too. Build up your network and you will start seeing interconnections, crossovers, and ways in which you could work together.

The reciprocal sharing of information and ideas is one of social media’s great strengths. It is a place to broadcast your message, but also to listen to what other have to say, and talk about it. Sharing is a two-way street and offers lots of opportunities.

Promoting both your own activities, and those of other groups, is a way to maximise engagement with the community. Hashtags – which work on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr – are a way of hooking into a wider community.

If you worry that social media is catering only to the online community, remember that people online talk to people offline too – so your message can be spread through word of mouth.

Facebook

Facebook has a large audience, and allows you to connect with relevant groups and local organisations. Creating a page gives you a space to share events and other information.

As at April 2015, over 2.5 million Kiwis active on Facebook every month. Find out more Key trends about Kiwis on Facebook.

Facebook photos

Facebook automatically resize and format your photos when you add them to Facebook. To help make sure your photos appear in the highest possible quality, try these tips from Facebook:

Resize your photo to one of the following supported sizes: Regular photos (width in pixels): 720px, 960px, 2048px. Cover photos should be 851px by 315px

Use Insights

Facebook Insights allows you to find out more about your users. What demographic are they in? When are they online? What posts do they find most engaging? Use the data to help you. For example, we found our users were mostly online between 6pm and 9pm. We can schedule posts for this time for maximum reach.

Create events

Facebook events are a great way of building a community. If you make an event page, you can invite people to the event, and you can also share information on it. See our Matariki event on Facebook.

Matariki1

Facebook advertising

If you have some money in your budget for advertising, consider using some of it on Facebook ads or boosted posts. You can target your information using demographics, and ensure your information gets a wider reach out into the community.

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Useful Facebook resources

Facebook pages

Here are some local Facebook pages that illustrate how an active presence and community can work well. They take a different approach and yet are all effective:

Other social media platforms and tools

  • Twitter is a microblogging platform with a fast sharing, active community.
  • Instagram is increasingly popular, and allows you to add filters to your images and pin them to a location.
  • Tumblr lets you create attractive, highly visual blog posts.
  • WordPress and Blogger are blogging platforms, and many groups use their blog as a website.
  • Flickr is a photo-based blogging platform.
  • Social media management tools like Hootsuite and TweetDeck allow you to monitor interactions and to schedule posts.

There are of course many more …

Conversationprism

Conversation Prism by Brian Solis and JESS3 (http://www.theconversationprism.com/) [CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

Resources

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet of Photo & Image Sizes on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn & Other Social Networks [Infographic]  Hubspot

Social Media Gameplan
A nine-step guide by Sport New Zealand for sports organisations starting off in social media.

Honoa te hapori me te hapu – ki te ipurangi – Getting your community and hapu online
A Department of Internal Affairs resource to help communities, hapū and iwi develop digital initiatives.

Social media
Useful information on social media in the New Zealand Government Web Toolkit.

Christchurch City Council courses for event organisers
Learn how to plan, organise and promote your own community recreation programme or event. CCC regularly run two workshops throughout the year: Get Set Go! and Spread the Word! These workshops and guides have been designed in collaboration with Wellington City Council.


Information updated 20 October 2016.
This post is an updated version of a 2013 post.

One library, two blogs

Since the arrival of our new website, we have been running two blogs.

Blogs (new!)

Positives

  1. These posts connect nicely with web pages, so you can see them display on the right hand side of relevant content. See Art.
  2. We can embed Flickr photosets into these posts. See Street art.

Negatives

  1. Only library members can comment on posts.
  2. Library Web Team cannot easily see if there are any comments, and therefore can’t respond to people’s queries, requests or comments.
  3. People cannot subscribe.

New blogNew blog post

Christchurch City Libraries blog (old!)

Positives

  1. It has been going since 2007 and has a substantial readership that is still growing.
  2. People can comment easily, and we are alerted to their comments.
  3. People can subscribe and have the latest post delivered to their email, or have it available in their WordPress dashboard.

Negatives

  1. It doesn’t connect up with the new website.

Old blog

What next?

We will continue running the two blogs at the moment, as the new one does not have the full functionality of the previous blog. Here is how we envisage the system working.

  • Bloggers can write their post in either environment, and the Library Web Team will edit and publish on both blogs.
  • The Library Web Team will link to Christchurch City Libraries blog when we publicise posts.
  • At the end of the posts on Blogs, the Library Web Team will add the words Kōrerorero mai – Join the conversation and link to the comments section of the Christchurch City Libraries blog.
    Here is an example: Feminism is a feminist issue (Join the conversation added to the bottom of post, linking to http://cclblog.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/feminism-is-a-feminist-issue/#comments)
  • The Library Web Team will make content cards for some posts so they can appear in the Browse sections of the web site. See Books.
  • The BiblioCommons catalogue has a new feature. We can now link blog posts to the catalogue. This is a nifty development you can see in action – under the bib record for Fire and movement by Peter Hart you can see “Opinion” and “Staff blog post”. Hey presto, there’s a link to Kat Moody’s blog post. The Library Web Team will do this addition as part of our publishing process.

More blog info:

  • The Christchurch kids blog has been discontinued, and kids’ content will now be published on the blogs in the same way as other topics.
  • The Bibliofile blog (that you are on right now) will remain as a place to post on professional topics.

We are working with BiblioCommons to get the new blog doing all the things we want it too.

In the meantime, the old blog has been reskinned and given a new theme and fresh look. It is linked to in the footer navigation of the website. Blog on!